CNSA News : 2018

Cognitive stress test predicts high levels of beta-amyloid

A simple and inexpensive word recall test accurately predicted whether people had elevated brain levels of beta-amyloid. Scientists hope this non-invasive stress test that puts pressure on memory—similar to how an exercise stress test checks cardiovascular health—could help identify subtle signs of cognitive impairment that may have previously been missed by standard memory tests.

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New UHealth center takes on fight against Alzheimer’s

According to 2018 statistics by the National Alzheimer’s Association, there are an estimated 5.7 million individuals in the United States with Alzheimer’s dementia. With the rapid growth of the older adult population, every 65 seconds a new case of Alzheimer’s disease is identified.

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Memory Loss: Why early intervention is key

What is life without memories? This devastating and frightening reality is one known too well by the over 5.7 million Americans affected with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States.

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Mental-health issues a burden for older minority adults

Nearly 20 percent of older adults have one or more mental-health conditions. The mental-health needs of older adults can be especially complex due to co-occurring physical health problems that contribute to a compromised quality of life.

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Aging in the 21st Century

In June 2018, the Department established the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging (CNSA), to address the urgent need for intervention and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, currently affecting 5.7 million people. One of the core aims of the CNSA is to technologically advance the cognitive assessment methodologies that are sensitive to preclinical dementia, and they are doing so through…

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Miller School Introduces Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging

The University of Miami Miller School of Medicine has renamed the Center on Aging as the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging, reflecting a growing emphasis on brain research, diagnostic and clinical services, and educational programs.

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Faculty Feature | Dr. David Loewenstein

Dr. David Loewenstein | Director, Center for Cognitive Neuroscience & Aging and Professor, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences

You have a long history with UM. Tell us about your ties to the university. I have considerable ties and affection for the University. I was born at Jackson Memorial Hospital, my parents worked and taught at UM. As a kid I went to some of the UM football games and this is my 32nd year as a faculty member.

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Novel Strategy Shows Promise for Earlier Detection of Alzheimer’s Disease

Finding an effective way to identify people with mild cognitive impairment who are most likely to go on to develop Alzheimer’s disease has eluded researchers for years. But now, a team of researchers led by David Loewenstein, Ph.D., director of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience and Aging (CNSA) and professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has devised a novel strategy that could do just that.

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Dr. Rosie Curiel Cid Receives Prestigious $3M NIH Grant for Research in Alzheimer’s Disease

Dr. Rosie Curiel Cid, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, joined the Miller School faculty in 2011. As a geriatric neuropsychologist, her expertise lies with the assessment of neurodegenerative conditions particularly Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. With Alzheimer’s disease being the sixth leading cause of death in the United States currently affecting 5.7 million people, the number is expected to reach 14 million by 2050. Dr. Curiel Cid has devoted her research to combating this terrible disease, and was recently awarded a prestigious $3 million grant by the NIH/NIA. Read on to learn more about her important work and how she obtained such a coveted award.

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There is help for Alzheimer's patients and their caregivers

It’s a heart-wrenching diagnosis that is affecting too many families around the world. Currently, more than five million Americans suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, and as our population ages, this number could potentially skyrocket to 16 million by 2050. It is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., causing tremendous financial disability and other burdens for caregivers.

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